Wonder Woman (DC Comics)

Started by The Joker, Tue, 24 Jan 2023, 22:35

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Giving Wondy her own thread in the comics section, and to possibly/occasionally post and blather about Wonder Woman topics that doesn't really associate with whatever is going on within the DCEU.

FLASHBACK 1997

Wizard Magazine's "character" profile of Wonder Woman.



What kinda stands out to me with this profile, was that it was published nearly 2 years into John Byrne's 3 year (some would say controversial stint) run on Wonder Woman from the summer of 1995 to the summer of 1998. Personally, I didn't really mind his run when I was reading it way back when, as it was bold and I love Byrne's art style, but at the same time I can also see how Byrne's stint on the book was 'your mileage may vary' depending on the reader. Being that Byrne took over the book just a few years following George Perez's universally praised and defining run on the character, definitely didn't do him many favors either. As he attempted some wild swings with not only Wonder Woman continuity, but the DCU 1990's continuity (post-Zero Hour) as well.

As far as Wonder Woman comics goes, John Byrne's time on the book was a notable one for sure. 


"Imagination is a quality given a man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humour was provided to console him for what he is."


Wonder Woman statue recently unveiled in Burbank.




"Imagination is a quality given a man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humour was provided to console him for what he is."

They gotta do Superman now to complete the trinity.

While the change from Clark Kent to Superman used various location means (most famously the phone booth), one of the more often used ways to change from Diana Prince to Wonder Woman was achieved by merely using the loop in her magical lasso.



Course, ever since the Lynda Carter Wonder Woman show, the slow-motion light flash spin has become to more widely known means of how Diana Prince changes into Wonder Woman. Nonetheless, in the pilot episode of that show, it's achieved a little differently. As it's basically Lynda removing her clothes in a network friendly manner while slowly spinning. Producer Douglas S. Cramer once referred to it as something of a "slow motion strip tease."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=knEy_qqrxJU

The light flash spin change was basically dropped during the Post-Crisis era due to "Diana Prince" being scaled back considerably compared to it's Pre-Crisis use. However, the classic flash spin would make a comeback following the "Infinite Crisis" event, when the Diana Prince identity was reinstated as a Agent.







"Imagination is a quality given a man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humour was provided to console him for what he is."

Quote from: The Joker on Tue, 24 Jan  2023, 22:35What kinda stands out to me with this profile, was that it was published nearly 2 years into John Byrne's 3 year (some would say controversial stint) run on Wonder Woman from the summer of 1995 to the summer of 1998. Personally, I didn't really mind his run when I was reading it way back when, as it was bold and I love Byrne's art style, but at the same time I can also see how Byrne's stint on the book was 'your mileage may vary' depending on the reader. Being that Byrne took over the book just a few years following George Perez's universally praised and defining run on the character, definitely didn't do him many favors either. As he attempted some wild swings with not only Wonder Woman continuity, but the DCU 1990's continuity (post-Zero Hour) as well.

As far as Wonder Woman comics goes, John Byrne's time on the book was a notable one for sure.
It's been all these years so his run is pretty hazy for me. But didn't he reinstate Wonder Woman's role in the JSA by having Hippolyta travel back in time, assume the identity of Wonder Woman and join the team? I swear to think that's what happened. And I love it, ONLY Byrne could make something that complicated.

Quote from: thecolorsblend on Sun, 12 Nov  2023, 05:18It's been all these years so his run is pretty hazy for me. But didn't he reinstate Wonder Woman's role in the JSA by having Hippolyta travel back in time, assume the identity of Wonder Woman and join the team? I swear to think that's what happened. And I love it, ONLY Byrne could make something that complicated.

Yeah, Byrne had a itch to reinstate Wondy as a JSA member via Queen Hippolyte and a time travel story, and has said he thought George Perez's idea of Wondy being an immortal amazon (she's stated to be over two thousand years old in the Carter tv show ... I can't remember if her age is stated in the DCAU, but she did have a WW2 adventure with Steve Trevor), but only 22-25 years old at the start of the Post-Crisis era, was something of a misstep. Despite publicly stating he enjoyed much of Perez's work on the character.

Evidently, the JSA/Hippolyte idea was Byrne's way of getting  "Wonder Woman" back as a founding JSA member (even if it wasn't Diana), without having to do a major retcon of George's work. As convoluted as it was, I can understand Byrne's point of view on this.


"Imagination is a quality given a man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humour was provided to console him for what he is."

The first issue of Post-Crisis Wonder Woman was one of the few comics I remember having, but I lost it ages ago. I will have to get my hands on it to read it again one day.

I read Batman/Superman/Wonder Woman: Trinity, and I remember the story didn't shy away from the tension that Wonder Woman and Batman had, specifically how she finds his crime-fighting methods to be rather brutal. This is something I doubt that most gatekeepers online would approve of because the protagonists having any sort of conflict appears to be out of the question for them. But without this drama between them, you have characters who agree with each other all the time. Where's the fun in that? It also makes you question if other heroes like Wonder Woman should be allowed to judge Batman's methods, are her methods any less terrorising than hers or Superman's just because he preys on fear?

Matt Wagner didn't shy away from Diana's distrust of Earth's volatile nature after she was tortured by Ra's al Ghul and Bizarro, even having her go so far as to condemn the patriarchial ways of the planet. Sure, she may have suffered a frenzied rant because of the side-effects by her dip into the Lazarus Pit, but even so, I don't mind this sort of feminist dialogue, because at some point, Diana learns to overcome prejudice to join forces with good men. The one comical moment, however, is when Batman is smitten at the sight of her having a bath when he found her at Themyscira, and she reacted by giving him a good punch in the mouth, haha.

For a story about the Trinity's first-ever meeting together, would it be appreciated if it were released today, or would it be ripped to shreds on social media? Well, I thought it was a good comic when I read, and I wouldn't mind reading it again.
QuoteJonathan Nolan: He [Batman] has this one rule, as the Joker says in The Dark Knight. But he does wind up breaking it. Does he break it in the third film?

Christopher Nolan: He breaks it in...

Jonathan Nolan: ...the first two.

Source: http://books.google.com.au/books?id=uwV8rddtKRgC&pg=PR8&dq=But+he+does+wind+up+breaking+it.&hl=en&sa=X&ei


Following George Perez's defining work on Wonder Woman, artist Brian Bolland took the reigns as Wonder Woman comic book cover artist from 1992 to 1995 (concluding just prior to the John Byrne run). Providing a multitude of memorable art featuring the Amazing Amazon.



"Imagination is a quality given a man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humour was provided to console him for what he is."


From Wonder Woman Volume 2 #167 in 2001. Art by Phil Jimenez. During the "Gods of Gotham" story line.



This was also during a time period where Adam Hughes was providing covers for the Wonder Woman title. A personal favorite Wonder Woman artist of mine. Here's a particular cover Hughes illustrated with Wondy and Bats.



"Imagination is a quality given a man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humour was provided to console him for what he is."


Who's Who in the DC Universe profile on the Golden Age Earth-Two Wonder Woman.



Being that this incarnation of Wonder Woman was also a survivor of "Crisis on Infinite Earths", it was cool seeing her return to correspond with the Post-Crisis Wonder Woman during "Infinite Crisis" 20 years later. She soon after faded away (possibly from existence? It was never resolved to my knowledge.) given that she departed from her refuge at Mount Olympus without the Gods' blessing in order to plea to Diana to be more 'human', and intervene between the battle of the Earth-Two Superman, and Post-Crisis Superman.


"Imagination is a quality given a man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humour was provided to console him for what he is."